How to Blanch Almonds

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You’re making a cookie or cake recipe and you’re halfway through and realize… it doesn’t just call for almonds, it calls for blanched almonds. Do you turn off the oven and head to the store?

Two photos showing roasted almonds on the left side and blanched almonds on the right side | Foodal

No need! Just use the almonds you already have on hand. It takes less than a minute to blanch and a couple of additional minutes to remove the skin.

A lot of of older recipes (and even some newer ones) call for peeled almonds. Blanching the nuts and removing the skin leaves a smooth finish on the nut.

Also you will save a few dollars by blanching your own right at home instead of buying the pre-skinned variety at the grocery store. The process is quick and easy.

The Recipe

A pile of peeled and unpeeled almonds | Foodal
How to Blanch Almonds
Votes: 2
Rating: 5
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
115 nuts 15 minutes
Cook Time
1 minutes
Servings Prep Time
115 nuts 15 minutes
Cook Time
1 minutes
A pile of peeled and unpeeled almonds | Foodal
How to Blanch Almonds
Votes: 2
Rating: 5
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
115 nuts 15 minutes
Cook Time
1 minutes
Servings Prep Time
115 nuts 15 minutes
Cook Time
1 minutes
Ingredients
  • 5 cups water
  • 5 ounces almonds 142 grams, 1 1/4 cups or about 115 nuts
Servings: nuts
Units:
Instructions
  1. Boil the water in a saucepan.
  2. Add the almonds and allow to boil for exactly 1 minute.
  3. Remove pan from heat and immediately pour the contents into a strainer or colander.
  4. Run cold water over the nuts to reduce the heat.
  5. Peel by squeezing the nuts with your index finger and thumb. The almonds should immediately slip from their peels. Warning: they tend to squirt out of their skins and become projectiles.

 

Cooking by the Numbers…

Step 1 – Boil

Bring a small pan of water to boil.

Raw almonds boiling in a small metal pot | Foodal

Add the raw almonds into the water and boil them for a minute. If you leave them in the boiling water much past this, the nuts will soften.

Step 2 – Drain and Blot

Use a colander or strainer to drain the nuts and run cold water over the top for a minute or two to keep them from softening.

Use a strainer to dry the nuts | Foodal

Allow the nuts to drip dry and then blot with a paper towel. The skins will be shriveled and beginning to slip off on their own.

Almonds on a cutting board being dried with a paper towel | Foodal

Step 3 – Squeeze and Peel

Gently squeeze the almonds between your thumb and index finger and the skin will slip right off of them. Squeeze a bit too? The nut will shoot across the room! Don’t let your kids steal any of these, or they’ll be using them as giant spitball replacements.

Peeling blanched almonds with a thumb and forefinger | Foodal

After the skins have been removed, it’s easier to slice the almonds in halves or slivers while they are still a bit damp.

A pile of peeled and unpeeled almonds | Foodal

You’ll need to let the nuts fully dry before you pack them away or use them in a recipe. Homemade blanched almonds are also perfect for grinding into almond meal.

Blanched almonds being cut in a half with a Japanese nakiri knife | Foodal
The knife in the photo is a called a nakiri. It’s a traditional type of Japanese kitchen knife usually used to chop up veggies, but this type works perfectly for detailed work such as slicing nuts.

You’ve successfully blanched your almonds! Get to baking!

What are your favorite recipes that use blanched almonds? Share with us in the comments.


Don’t forget to Pin It!

Do you have a recipe that calls for blanched almonds but you just have regular nuts in your pantry? You can blanch and deskin them yourself in a couple of minutes. Find out what you need to know now!

Photos by Mike Quinn, © Ask the Experts, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.See our TOS for more details.

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About Mike Quinn

Mike Quinn spent 20 years in the US Army and traveled extensively all over the world. As part of his military service, Mike sampled coffee and tea from all virtually every geographic region, from the beans from the plantation of an El Salvadorian Army Colonel to "Chi" in Iraq to Turkish Coffee in the Turkish Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan. He spent nearly a decade in the Republic of Korea where he was exposed to all forms of traditional teas. Mike formerly owned and operated Cup And Brew, an online espresso and coffee equipment retail operation.

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