Start the Day (or Continue the Night) with a Black Eye

If you’re thinking about a particularly popular American hip-hop group (minus the peas), then you need to know, this is not the recipe for a billboard chart topper.

 Start the Day (or Continue the Night) with a Black Eye | Foodal.com

A Black Eye is basically a type of dripped coffee with a strong taste, because of the prevailing strength of the two shots of espresso that makes up the bulk of its ingredients.

Black Eye coffee has many alternative names, all of which employ slightly different ratios of espresso to coffee. These include Gold Nugget, Red Eye, Shot Put, Hammer Head, Sling Blade, Depth Charge, Shot in the Dark, Cafe Tobio, and Autobahn.

Different cafes have different names for the Black Eye. It is known as the Depth Charge at Caribou Coffee, which they also federally registered as trademark.

In San Francisco, the Black Eye is otherwise known as the Sledgehammer or Hammerhead. It is called a Sludge Cop in Alaska, because of the state’s huge petroleum sector.

In the Pacific Northwest, it is called a Shot in the Dark if it is made with a single shot, and Double Shot in the Dark if it uses a double shot of espresso. At the nationally familiar Dunkin’ Donuts, this coffee is otherwise called a Turbo, and it may be purchased either hot or cold.

The drink first received the name Black Eye because of the circular black marking that results after pouring the espresso shot on top of the coffee with cream.

One variation is sometimes called Red Eye, because of the lesser amount of zip added for those who need enough caffeine to keep them up for a shorter period. The Black Eye is usually made with two shots of espresso whereas the Red Eye is often made with one.

The necessary ingredients for making this beverage are simply coffee, espresso, and cream to taste, which is optional.

After brewing your base coffee at 195-205°F, and pouring it with cream added to taste, you just have to add the shots of espresso.

For the Black Eye you have to add two to three shots of espresso over the coffee with cream. If you are going for a Red Eye, then add just one shot of espresso.

Four or more shots of espresso would transform this type of coffee into what the nocturnal java lovers among us brand the Deadeye. It’s known for keeping one alive, alert, awake and enthusiastic for the longest possible time.

Read more coffee and espresso recipes now.

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About Mike Quinn

Mike Quinn spent 20 years in the US Army and traveled extensively all over the world. As part of his military service, Mike sampled coffee and tea from all virtually every geographic region, from the beans from the plantation of an El Salvadorian Army Colonel to "Chi" in Iraq to Turkish Coffee in the Turkish Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan. He spent nearly a decade in the Republic of Korea where he was exposed to all forms of traditional teas. Mike formerly owned and operated Cup And Brew, an online espresso and coffee equipment retail operation.

2 thoughts on “Start the Day (or Continue the Night) with a Black Eye”

  1. I must say, espresso does make me scared, like I commented on a previous article similar to this one, when it comes to any beverage with lots of caffeine, I’d rather proceed with caution lest I become extremely jittery after indulging…especially where the title of the article states ; Black Eye, then that’s code word for; Proceed With Absolute Caution!

  2. I don’t really enjoy coffee that much. I’m not really the type of person that can’t wake up properly and I’d much rather drink some tea or milk in the morning. I don’t understand why people enjoy the taste of it, doesn’t float my boat! 😛

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