How to Cook Pork Roast in the Electric Pressure Cooker

There are few things that I find more comforting than a roast. Whether it’s a pot roast or pork, there’s a true fondness in my heart for this kind of meal.

Vertical image of a large piece of meat on a tray with chopped potatoes and carrots, with text in the middle and on the bottom of the image.

The warmth of a roast is something that brings me back to those lovingly slow-cooked meals made by parents and grandparents. The enticing aroma of a hearty entree wafts in from the kitchen, and a lazy Sunday is centered around the tradition of the family meal, beginning with anticipating the comfort that said meal would surely bring us at the end of the day.

Thank goodness we have modern appliances to help us master preparing these meals in a more efficient way today, right? Because waiting hours and hours for a roast to cook in the oven just isn’t my cup of tea.

Time spent preparing a fantastic savory entree is well worth it, but let’s face it, none of us wants to devote a whole day to making it, unless maybe it’s for a really special occasion – even when we happen to have a ton of time on our hands.

This is why learning how to cook pork roast in the electric pressure cooker is something you must do. It’s been a lifesaver for me and my husband.

Vertical image of a large piece of seared meat on a black serving platter surrounded by chopped potatoes and carrots.

He is a huge fan of all the classic meaty mains, and when I’m cooking, I am a fan of any comforting meal that can be put on the table without a ton of effort.

That’s what led us to this particular how-to guide. There are a few reasons that I absolutely love cooking a pork roast in the electric pressure cooker.

First, you have the Saute function, which allows you to sear the exterior of the meat and cook it with the onion all together in one pot.

That means less cleanup, which I live for in the colder months when I’m feeling extra lazy (or right in this moment as I am writing, because I’m currently entering my ninth month of pregnancy and doing ANYTHING is tiring at this point).

Vertical image of pouring gravy over a large piece of seared meat on a platter with chopped potatoes and carrots.

Second, you can roast the pork without it getting soggy and soft, because of the delightful little trivet.

That was my first worry when using the pressure cooker, because I didn’t want to lose the sear and have it just sit in liquid. Instead, the trivet raises the meat up and out of the liquid, preserving that sear perfectly.

Finally, it’s the magic of the appliance that we all know and love – just turn it on, and walk away.

This particular cooking method takes a little longer than some other pressure cooker recipes you might be familiar with, so you really are freeing up your time to do something else.

Whether that is getting some chores done, reading a book, or spending time with family, it helps to not have to tend to the meat meticulously while it’s on the stove or in the oven.

Vertical image of a large piece of meat with slices on a serving platter surrounded by cubed potatoes and carrots.

Want to change things up? Experiment with different seasonings to give your home-cooked protein entree a different flavor! A simple Italian or French blend can be a nice variation.

My biggest piece of advice is not to skip making the gravy at the end of cooking before you serve. You can use the drippings from the roast and, with a dash of fresh herbs and balsamic vinegar, it has ample flavor to pair with the juicy and tender meat.

Now, let’s talk about that much-anticipated cooking method!

How to Cook Pork Roast in the Electric Pressure Cooker

Instead of spending hours waiting for pork to roast in the oven, let your favorite appliance do the work for you.

Step 1 – Chop, Measure Ingredients, and Make a Spice Rub

To begin, gather your ingredients. Here’s everything you’ll need.

For the Spice Rub:

  • 2 tablespoons packed light brown sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground sage
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

For the Pork:

  • 1/4 cup olive oil, divided
  • 1/2 medium yellow onion, chopped (about 1/2 cup)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 pounds boneless pork shoulder roast (also called pork butt)
  • 1 cup chicken stock
  • 1/2 cup dry red wine
  • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1 1/2 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary leaves

Next, it’s time for prep.

Horizontal image of a dry spice mixture in a glass bowl.

In a small bowl, stir together the ingredients for the spice rub until combined.

Peel and chop half a medium onion.

Peel and mince two cloves of garlic.

Chop enough fresh rosemary leaves until you have 1 teaspoon total.

Horizontal image of assorted ingredients and a hunk of raw meat in various glass bowls and dishes.

Measure out the remaining ingredients as listed on the ingredients list.

When you are selecting a red wine for this recipe, I recommend choosing a dry red wine like a pinot noir or cabernet. It will contribute a lovely flavor to the gravy.

Step 2 – Prep and Sear Pork

Rub the spice mixture all over the pork roast so that it is completely covered. Set it aside.

Turn on the Saute function on your electric pressure cooker, and add 2 tablespoons of olive oil.

Once it’s hot, add the onion. Cook for 2 to 3 minutes, stirring occasionally, until it has softened.

Stir in the garlic and cook until it’s fragrant, about 30 seconds to 1 minute. Remove the onion and garlic from the insert, and set these aside in a small bowl.

Horizontal image of searing a large piece of meat in a pot.

Add the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil to the insert. Sear the seasoned pork on all sides, for about 2 to 3 minutes per side. Remove the pork from the insert and set it aside on a clean plate.

Pour in the chicken stock and wine, using a wooden spoon to scrape up any brown bits from the bottom of the insert. Stir in the cooked garlic and onion.

Step 3 – Pressure Cook

Place the trivet in the bottom of the insert and set the seared pork roast on top. Seal the pressure cooker, and set it to Manual. Cook on High pressure for 70 minutes.

Horizontal image of a seared large piece of meat in an Instant Pot.

Manually release the pressure as soon as it is done cooking.

Remove the roast from the insert, and set it aside on a cutting board to rest.

Step 4 – Make Gravy

While the roast is resting, make the gravy in the bottom of the insert. First, remove the trivet and set the pressure cooker to Saute.

Horizontal image of gravy boiling in a pot.

In a small bowl, whisk together the cornstarch and balsamic vinegar until well-combined. Add the slurry and the rosemary to the insert, and whisk together until the cornstarch has dissolved.

Cook for about 3 to 4 minutes, until the sauce has thickened. Taste and season with salt and pepper as desired.

Horizontal image of a large piece of seared meat on a black serving platter surrounded by chopped potatoes and carrots.

Slice and serve the pork roast with the gravy.

What Should I Serve with This Pork Roast?

In terms of sides, I love roasted root vegetables like potatoes and carrots, but you can also use green beans, Brussels sprouts, parsnips, turnips, or whatever’s in season and looking good at the store.

Horizontal image of a large piece of meat with slices on a serving platter surrounded by cubed potatoes and carrots.

You can also serve this with the gravy over noodles or mashed potatoes. And don’t forget to make sandwiches with the leftovers, if there are any!

For even more delicious protein entrees to make in the electric pressure cooker, check out the following how-to guides from Foodal next:

What’s your favorite side to serve with pork roast? Tell us in the comments below.

Photos by Meghan Yager, © Ask the Experts, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. See our TOS for more details. With additional writing and editing by Allison Sidhu.

About Meghan Yager

Meghan Yager is a food addict turned food and travel writer with a love for creating uncomplicated, gourmet recipes and devouring anything the world serves up. As the author of the food and travel blog Cake 'n Knife, Meghan focuses on unique foodie experiences from around the world to right at home in your own kitchen.

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