Einkorn Snickerdoodle Cookies

Selecting a snickerdoodle cookie from the bakery or grocery store is always a tense gamble:

Vertical image of a stack of cookies coating in a spice and sugar layer, with text on the top and bottom of the image.

Will it be crispy and crumbly, or thick and chewy?

Will it have a hint of vanilla or almond extract?

Will it have bold cinnamon flavor, or will the spice level be soft and subtle?

We all have our preferences when it comes to eating a snickerdoodle, and those set a lot of expectations when eating one from somewhere other than your own kitchen.

Vertical image of a line of cookies on a wooden tray next to a metal spoon and a white towel.

In my situation, I much prefer eating the gooey cookie dough dipped in a little bit of the cinnamon-sugar mixture. But (as I grudgingly admit), it is unacceptable to eat huge globs of raw dough due to health concerns.

And because you want to avoid the embarrassing moment of total lack of etiquette when a family member catches you slobbering all over the paddle attachment, trying to lick off any remaining delicious bits of dough before tossing it into the dishwasher.

Vertical close-up image of half-eaten cookies with a spice coating on a wooden board.

But maybe that’s just me? (I hope not. Please don’t let this just be me.)

With that said, I like my einkorn flour snickerdoodles to come out a certain way. I’ll tell you exactly what you’re in for:

These cookies are big, slightly soft and chewy, with crispy edges, and covered in a perfectly thin crust of sugar and cinnamon.

Vertical close-up image of a tall stack of cookies on a gray stand.

Sure, they’re fully baked, but their chewy interior was inspired by my obsession with soft and luscious cookie dough.

With the sweet crust, a sensible amount of cinnamon, and a hint of almond extract, the cookies are well-balanced. None of the flavors or textures clash or overwhelm each other.

And the use of einkorn flour has its own set of benefits – some sources claim this ancient form of wheat is easy to digest compared to more processed modern-day white flours.

Vertical top-down image of individual baked goods with a cinnamon sugar coating on a wooden tray next to a metal spoon.

All in all, it’s an impressive cookie.

Don’t want to gamble with buying one from the store? If my recipe describes your perfect cookie, homemade is the way to go!

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Horizontal image of half-eaten cookies on a wooden tray.

Einkorn Snickerdoodle Cookies


  • Author: Nikki Cervone
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 16 minutes
  • Total Time: 50 minutes
  • Yield: 1 dozen cookies 1x

Description

Homemade einkorn snickerdoodle cookies have the perfect soft and chewy and texture, balanced by the crispy cinnamon and sugar coating.


Ingredients

Scale

For the Cookies:

  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 tablespoon whole milk, room temperature
  • 1/4 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1 egg yolk, room temperature
  • 1 1/4 cups all-purpose einkorn flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt

For the Cinnamon-Sugar Coating:

  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone mats.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy on high speed, about 5 to 7 minutes. Add the milk, almond extract, and egg yolk. Combine until smooth on medium speed, another 30 seconds.
  3. In a separate small bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.
  4. Adding a few scoopfuls of the dry ingredients at a time to the butter mixture, and blend at low speed just until thoroughly combined, about 1 minute. Do not overmix.
  5. Scrape the dough from the sides of the bowl and the paddle attachment. Transfer the dough to a large clean bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Refrigerate for 20 to 30 minutes to slightly chill and firm the dough.
  6. As the dough is chilling, make the sugar coating by whisking together the sugar and cinnamon in a separate small bowl.
  7. Remove the dough from the refrigerator. Use a medium-sized cookie scooper to portion out even amounts of dough (about two tablespoons each). Gently roll the dough in your hands to create a smooth ball. Roll each ball in the cinnamon-sugar mixture to completely coat the exterior with a thin layer. 
  8. Place each mound on the prepared baking sheets, 6 per sheet with about 2 inches of space in between each. 
  9. Bake for 13 to 15 minutes, or until cracked and slightly puffy. The cookies will still be very soft and white around the edges, but will continue to harden out of the oven. 
  10. Remove from the oven and let cool on the sheets for 5 minutes before transferring to cooling racks to cool completely.
  • Category: Cookies
  • Method: Baking
  • Cuisine: Dessert

Keywords: einkorn flour, cinnamon, snickerdoodle, cookie

Cooking by the Numbers…

Step 1 – Prep

Horizontal image of prepped wet and dry ingredients in white bowls of assorted sizes next to a whisk.

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone mats.

Measure out all of the ingredients needed for the dough, making sure to soften the unsalted butter and bring the egg yolk and milk to room temperature. After separating the egg, the egg white can be saved for another use.

Whisk together the flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt in a separate small bowl.

Step 2 – Make and Chill the Dough

Horizontal image of thick yellow dough in a white bowl.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream together the unsalted butter and sugar until light and fluffy on high speed, about 5 to 7 minutes.

Add the milk, almond extract, and egg yolk. Combine until smooth on medium speed, for another 30 seconds or so.

Adding a few scoopfuls of the dry ingredients to the butter mixture at a time, blend together at low speed just until thoroughly combined and a thick dough forms, for another minute. You don’t want to overmix it, as you’ll toughen the texture of the final product.

Scrape the dough from the sides of the bowl and the paddle attachment. Transfer the dough to a large clean bowl and cover the bowl with plastic wrap.

Refrigerate for 20 to 30 minutes to slightly chill and firm the dough. This step helps to prevent the cookies from spreading excessively and thinning out as they bake.

Step 3 – Make the Sugar and Cinnamon Mixture

Horizontal image of a cinnamon and sugar mixture in a white bowl next to a whisk.

As the dough is chilling, whisk together the sugar and cinnamon in a separate small bowl until the cinnamon is evenly dispersed.

Step 4 – Portion and Roll

Horizontal image of a bowl of thick batter, a bowl of a cinnamon sugar mixture, a plate with an ice cream scooper, and a tray lined with a silicone mat.

To avoid creating a large mess, work in a neat assembly line for this step. Organize the following setup on your counter:

  • On the far left or directly in front of you: a medium-sized cookie scoop (fits about two tablespoons of dough) on a plate
  • To the right of the cookie scoop: the bowl of chilled dough
  • In the middle: the bowl of sugar and cinnamon
  • On the far right: the prepared baking sheets

Using the cookie scoop, portion the dough and gently roll each mound in your hands to create a smooth surface. Carefully drop it into the sugar and cinnamon mixture. With one hand, roll the mound in the mixture, covering the entire surface with a thin and even layer.

Horizontal image of a hand holding a ball of yellow dough.

Gently shake off any excess and place it on the baking sheet.

Horizontal image of rolling a mound of dough in a sugar and spice coating.

Repeat with the remaining dough and place on the baking sheets. Because the cookies will spread a little, place 6 cookies on each sheet spaced about 2 inches apart from each other.

Horizontal image of 6 mounds of unbaked dough on a tray lined with a silicone mat.

Love that cinnamon-sugar topping? You can sprinkle the top of each cookie with any leftover sugar mixture before you bake!

Step 5 – Bake

Horizontal image of 6 baked cookies on a tray lined with a silicone mat.

Remove from the refrigerator and bake for 13 to 15 minutes, or until the surface of the cookies is cracked and puffy.

Note: Don’t overbake them! The cookies will still be very soft to the touch, and will still appear white around the edges. They will continue to set after they’ve been taken out of the oven. Don’t be tempted to continue baking them until the edges are a golden-brown color or they will become too hard and crispy once cooled completely.

Not the worst mistake to make, though… they’ll still be tasty if you bake them for more time than you anticipated!

Step 6 – Cool and Serve

Horizontal image of half-eaten cookies on a wooden tray.

Remove from the oven and let cool on the sheets for 5 minutes before transferring to wire cooling racks to cool completely. Enjoy!

Send in the Pastry Assistants

Making this recipe is the perfect opportunity to get your own little snickerdoodles of the family involved and having fun in the kitchen.

Horizontal image of crinkled small baked goods on a small wooden tray.

The kids will love to help with portioning and rolling, and it’s a great lesson to teach them how to follow steps in order and how to work cleanly and efficiently.

But who would be mad if just a little teeny-tiny clump of dough falls on the counter, to be enjoyed as a well-earned snack?

You be the judge – I know you’re on my side.

How do you like your snickerdoodle cookies? Do you prefer if they’re thick and chewy, or thin and crispy? Share your favorite versions in the comment section below!

For more cookie classics, we have so many amazing recipes to share with you. Try these next:

Photos by Nikki Cervone, © Ask the Experts, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. See our TOS for more details. Originally published by Shanna Mallon on May 11, 2016. Last updated on April 6, 2021.

Nutritional information derived from a database of known generic and branded foods and ingredients and was not compiled by a registered dietitian or submitted for lab testing. It should be viewed as an approximation.

About Nikki Cervone

Nikki Cervone is a hungry foodie living in Pittsburgh. Nikki holds an AAS in baking/pastry from Westmoreland County Community College, a BA in Communications from Duquesne University, and an MLA in Gastronomy from Boston University. When she is not tearing through her city's best cheesesteaks, Nikki enjoys a healthy dose of yoga and chocolate. Lots of chocolate.

4 thoughts on “Einkorn Snickerdoodle Cookies”

  1. Snickerdoodles is one of my favorite cookies to make, but my recipe is nowhere near as healthy as yours. I need to try this recipe, so I don’t feel so guilty when I eat them. 🙂

    Reply

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