Einkorn Salad with Radicchio and Walnuts

Here we are, gang, another week, and I’m still talking about einkorn.

I know.

But I figure, when I brought you this article you all were such champs, looking a new ingredient in the face boldly and bravely, ready to give it a shot, that maybe you wouldn’t mind just one more einkorn post to follow it?

Vertical overhead image of a large glass mixing bowl of einkorn, radicchio, walnut, and green apple salad, on an unfinished wood surface with lemon slices and wedges, and sprigs of Italian flat leaf parsley, printed with orange and white text at the midpoint and the bottom of the frame.

The thing is, while we’ve already told you einkorn flour is a tasty and nutritious option for making cakes, scones, bagels, pizza, pancakes, cookies, and more, and while you know you can create your own einkorn flour by buying the berries and grinding them at home, there’s something else that needs to be said, because there’s more to einkorn berries than flour:

Einkorn berries can hold their own.

Closeup horizontal image of a small glass bowl of uncooked einkorn berries, surrounded by similarly sized white ceramic, blue ceramic, and clear glass bowls of chopped green apple, lemon juice, chopped walnuts, and chopped parsley, on an unfinished wood surface.

The truth is, though I’ve briefly mentioned before that the berries can be used in porridge or salads, I cannot emphasize enough what a delicious option this truly is. So, today is all about the berries, and one of our favorite ways to enjoy them.

Sometime last month, Tim and I were dining at Marché, a beautiful East Nashville cafe surrounded by draped windows and filled with rustic farmhouse tables and chairs.

Vertical overhead image of a large glass bowl of einkorn salad with radicchio, walnuts, and green apple, on an aged and weathered unfinished wood surface.

He ordered a farro salad kind of like this einkorn one, and it was so good, I wished I’d ordered the same thing. At Marché, they stick to simple, flavorful dishes, inspired by tastes in Italy and France, always arranged in a way that’s visually appealing.

Vertical overhead tightly framed image of half of a glass mixing bowl filled with a mixture of cooked einkorn wheat berries, chopped radicchio, and green apple, on an unfinished wood surface with half of a lemon and a sprig of Italian parsley.

This past weekend we made this einkorn salad, bright and colorful, both chewy from the einkorn berries and crunchy from the radicchio pieces. I thought of Marché, and why a simple salad is a tough thing to beat.

“Let things taste of what they are,” Alice Waters once said, and I get what she means.

Overhead vertical image of a glass of einkorn, green apple, radicchio, and walnut salad, with a spoon stuck into the bowl, a green bottle of oil, sprigs of green Italian flat leaf parsley, and lemon wedges, on an unfinished wood table.

Rather than hiding the faint sweetness of the einkorn or the bitterness of the radicchio, rather than covering the pungency, nuttiness, or herbal qualities of the shallots, walnuts, and parsley, this salad brings them all together. It melds their tastes, highlights all of their individual flavors and textures, and provides a dish that’s delightful to eat.

Overhead closely cropped vertical image of einkorn, radicchio, walnut, and green apple salad in a glass bowl, surrounded by lemon wedges and sprigs of fresh herbs.

While the honey finish in this recipe may seem excessive, trust us. The bitterness of the raw radicchio and the subtle bite of the shallots is offset by the hefty drizzle of honey at the end of each bite.

Print
Horizontal overhead image of a grain salad in a glass bowl, made with einkorn, radicchio, Granny Smith apple, and other ingredients, with a utensil for stirring, on an unfinished wood surface with half of a lemon and sprigs of parsley.

Einkorn Salad with Radicchio and Walnuts


  • Author: Kelli McGrane
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 30 minutes
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: 6 servings 1x

Description

Addictively crunchy and bursting with bright flavors, this einkorn salad makes for a stunning and healthy side dish.


Scale

Ingredients

For the Salad:

  • ½ cup einkorn berries
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 small head radicchio, chopped finely
  • 2 shallots, minced
  • ½ cup toasted walnuts
  • 2 Granny Smith apples, diced
  • 5 tablespoons raw honey
  • Additional salt and pepper to taste

For the Dressing:

  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • ¼ cup lemon juice (about 1 ½ lemons)
  • ¼ cup minced parsley
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Instructions

  1. Place einkorn and water in a small saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Once boiling, reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer for 30 minutes, or until water has been absorbed and einkorn is chewy.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together dressing ingredients and set aside.
  3. Transfer cooked einkorn to a large bowl and add radicchio and shallots. Pour prepared dressing on top and toss well to coat.
  4. Add apples, walnuts, and honey. Toss well to combine. Taste and add additional salt and pepper if needed. Serve immediately.

  • Category: Grain Salads
  • Method: Stovetop
  • Cuisine: Vegetarian

Keywords: einkorn, einkorn berries, einkorn wheat berries, grain salad, radicchio, walnuts

Cooking By the Numbers…

Step 1 – Chop Produce and Measure Ingredients

Horizontal overhead image of a small head of purple and white radicchio that has been cut in half, with the two pieces arranged side by side cut side down on a white plastic cutting board, with a santoku knife at the top of the frame.

Chop the radicchio and apple, and mince the shallots.

Oblique overhead horizontal image of eight medium-sized and small glass and blue or white ceramic bowls of chopped Granny Smith apple, lemon juice, shredded radicchio, walnuts, uncooked einkorn wheat, Italian parsley leaves, honey and chopped shallots, with a green bottle of olive oil that is resting on its side, on an unfinished wood table.

Measure out all of the remaining ingredients.

Step 2 – Cook

Place the wheat berries and water in a small saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat.

Overhead image of cooked einkorn wheat in the bottom of a nonstick saucepan, on a pink and white folded checkered cloth on top of an unfinished wood table.

Once boiling, reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer for 30 minutes, or until the water has been absorbed and the grain has a chewy texture.

Step 3 – Make Dressing

Horizontal overhead image of a glass jar filled with dressing ingredients including oil, spices, and chopped fresh herbs, with a measuring spoon, a glass spice jar with a plastic shaker top, and a white plastic lid, on an unfinished wood surface.

In a small bowl, combine the olive oil, lemon juice, parsley, salt, and pepper. Whisk well to emulsify.

Horizontal image of a small glass jar of homemade herb and lemon salad dressing with a metal lid, with a metal measuring spoon to the left, and several jars, bowls, and canisters of ingredients in the background, on a light brown wood surface.

As an alternative, you can also add all of the dressing ingredients to a small mason jar, put the lid on tightly, and shake it up to combine.

If you want another herbaceous dressing to try with this salad, you’ll love our lemon and tarragon pesto dressing!

Step 4 – Combine Ingredients, Toss, and Serve

Overhead horizontal image of a mixture of thinly sliced radicchio and cooked einkorn wheat berries in a clear glass bowl, on a wood surface.

Transfer the cooked grain to a large bowl. Add the radicchio and shallots. Pour the prepared dressing on top, and toss well to coat.

Horizontal overhead image of a glass bowl of chopped green onion and radicchio topped with honey, with cooked einkorn wheat berries at the bottom of the bowl, on an unfinished grayish brown wood surface.

Add the apples, walnuts, and honey.

Horizontal overhead image of a grain salad in a glass bowl, made with einkorn, radicchio, Granny Smith apple, and other ingredients, with a utensil for stirring, on an unfinished wood surface with half of a lemon and sprigs of parsley.

Toss well to combine, then taste and add additional salt and/or pepper if needed. Enjoy immediately.

The Versatility of Einkorn

Do yourself a favor and buy a big bag of einkorn. Not only is it cheaper to buy it in bulk, but you’ll be pleasantly surprised to discover all the different ways you can use it.

Substitute it in for quinoa or barley in soups and grain bowls, pulse it into smaller pieces and simmer it with milk for a fiber-rich breakfast porridge, or keep pulsing until it forms a fine flour to add to cookies, scones, and breads.

Horizontal oblique overhead closely cropped image of a large glass bowl of einkorn, radicchio, apple, and walnut salad, on a wood surface that has not been painted or stained, with half of a lemon and a sprig of fresh flat leaf parsley.

Here are some of our favorite ways to use this nutrient-rich grain:

Let us know your favorite way to enjoy this whole grain in the comments below, and don’t forget to give this salad a rating as soon as you’ve tried it!

Photos by Kelli McGrane, © Ask the Experts, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. See our TOS for more details. Originally published on January 29, 2013. Last updated: November 6, 2019 at 19:25 pm. With additional writing and editing by Kelli McGrane and Allison Sidhu.

Nutritional information derived from a database of known generic and branded foods and ingredients and was not compiled by a registered dietitian or submitted for lab testing. It should be viewed as an approximation.

The contents of this article have been reviewed and verified by a registered dietitian for informational purposes only. This article should not be construed as personalized or professional medical advice. Foodal and Ask the Experts, LLC assume no liability for the use or misuse of the material presented above. Always consult with a medical professional before changing your diet, or using supplements or manufactured or natural medications.

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About Shanna Mallon

Shanna Mallon is a freelance writer who holds an MA in writing from DePaul University. Her work has been featured in a variety of media outlets, including The Kitchn, Better Homes & Gardens, Taste of Home, Houzz.com, Foodista, Entrepreneur, and Ragan PR. In 2014, she co-authored The Einkorn Cookbook with her husband, Tim. Today, you can find her digging into food topics and celebrating the everyday grace of eating on her blog, Go Eat Your Bread with Joy. Shanna lives in Nashville, Tennessee, with Tim and their two small kids.

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