Fresh Berry Syrups: A Quick and Easy Way to Use Your Surplus

Making fresh berry syrups is a simple process that doesn’t require much time. Syrups can be made from fresh or frozen fruit. Ideally, berries would be picked fresh from a backyard garden, but store bought fruit works just as well.

Fresh Fruit Syrups

Fresh berry syrups are the perfect accompaniment to pancakes, pastries, pound cake, and other sweets, but also make great additions to meats, vegetable dishes, sauces, and soups.

Syrups can be sweetened with sugar, honey, agave, and even artificial sweeteners. You can also drizzle them on ice cream or pancakes, or use them to make cocktails or flavor your morning cup of joe.

Making your own syrups is a fun family event that can start by visiting local pick-your-own farms. If you’re adventurous, pick a few bushels and preserve them in jars for later.

If you’d rather start out with smaller batches of syrup, the following recipes are good options.

Prior to cooking, be sure to thoroughly wash the berries, and remove stems and cores. Some berry stems are toxic (like elderberries), so if you’re uncertain, take a minute to conduct the necessary research or ask a berry farmer.

Fresh Strawberry Syrup

Although it’s not a requirement, a food processor can greatly assist in the blending of the berries that go into these recipes. If you don’t have a food processor, a  blender can also work well.

Looking for a different use for those fresh berries? Try making a fruit-filled drinking vinegar, perfect for use in cocktails and non-alcoholic beverages.

Fresh Strawberry Syrup | Foodal.com
Fresh Strawberry Syrup
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If you love strawberries you'll appreciate the intense flavor in this fresh syrup. It is perfect with pound cake, angel food cake, pancakes, and buttermilk biscuits. It also tastes great over grilled chicken and white fish, like mahi-mahi and cod. Kick up the flavor a notch by adding one tablespoon of Balsamic vinegar to this recipe.
Servings Prep Time
1 cup 10 minutes
Cook Time
10 minutes
Servings Prep Time
1 cup 10 minutes
Cook Time
10 minutes
Fresh Strawberry Syrup | Foodal.com
Fresh Strawberry Syrup
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
If you love strawberries you'll appreciate the intense flavor in this fresh syrup. It is perfect with pound cake, angel food cake, pancakes, and buttermilk biscuits. It also tastes great over grilled chicken and white fish, like mahi-mahi and cod. Kick up the flavor a notch by adding one tablespoon of Balsamic vinegar to this recipe.
Servings Prep Time
1 cup 10 minutes
Cook Time
10 minutes
Servings Prep Time
1 cup 10 minutes
Cook Time
10 minutes
Ingredients
  • ¼ cup water
  • 1 1/2 cups fresh strawberries trimmed and halved
  • ½-1 cup turbinado sugar or raw sugar
Servings: cup
Units:
Instructions
  1. Place most of your berries in a heavy saucepan and crush with a potato masher (leave a few to be added later for whole chunks if desired). Berries can also be pulverized in a food processor or by immersion hand blender. Set temperature to medium-high and add water. Bring mixture to a boil then reduce temperature to medium low. Simmer for 5 minutes or until berries are soft and juicy.
  2. Position a wire mesh colander over a 2 cup measuring cup or small bowl. To get the most juice strain the berries, then gently mash pulp with a rubber spatula.
  3. The amount of sugar can be determined by the amount of juice. Use equal amounts of sugar to juice. If you have ¾ cup of berry juice, add ¾ cup sugar. When substituting with honey, use ½ cup to ¾ cup juice. Most artificial sweetener manufacturers publish conversion charts on their website, so you might want to check the brand you're using.
  4. Wash the saucepan then add sugar and juice. Set temperature to medium and bring syrup to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 1 to 2 minutes. The syrup should have a thick and sticky consistency, but still runny.
  5. Use a spoon to skim foam from syrup. Add remaining strawberry halves. Serve immediately or transfer to airtight container and store in refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.
Recipe Notes

Fresh Strawberry Syrump

 

Homemade Blackberry Syrup
Zingy Blackberry Syrup
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Blackberries are prolific produces in July, August, and September in most parts of the country. Whether using wild blackberries or cultivated varieties, a nice semi-sweet syrup is a great way to use up some these highly nutritious fruits which are loaded with anti-oxidants.
Servings Prep Time
1 cup 10 minutes
Cook Time
5 minutes
Servings Prep Time
1 cup 10 minutes
Cook Time
5 minutes
Homemade Blackberry Syrup
Zingy Blackberry Syrup
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Blackberries are prolific produces in July, August, and September in most parts of the country. Whether using wild blackberries or cultivated varieties, a nice semi-sweet syrup is a great way to use up some these highly nutritious fruits which are loaded with anti-oxidants.
Servings Prep Time
1 cup 10 minutes
Cook Time
5 minutes
Servings Prep Time
1 cup 10 minutes
Cook Time
5 minutes
Ingredients
  • 1-1/2 cups Blackberries
  • ½ cup Cranberry Juice
  • 1-1/2 teaspoon Arrowroot powder can substitute with corn starch
  • 1/2 cup granulated Sugar
  • ½ teaspoon freshly grated Lemon peel
  • 1 Tablespoon fresh Lemon Juice
Servings: cup
Units:
Instructions
  1. Combine blackberries and cranberry juice in a blender and puree until smooth and juicy.
  2. Transfer mixture to small saucepan and add arrowroot.
  3. Cook over medium heat until mixture begins to bubble.
  4. Add sugar, lemon peel and juice. Stir to combine ingredients.
  5. Skim foam from syrup. Serve immediately or transfer to airtight container and store in refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.
Recipe Notes

Homemade Blackberry Syrup

 

Homemade Blueberry and Mango Syrup
Mango and Blueberry Syrup
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Blueberry's also abound throughout the spring and summer (depends on variety) and are found anywhere that has acidic soil - particular in areas that have pine forests (the needles are acidic). These berries make excellent syrups and jams. The addition of mango gives this recipe and extra little bite and makes it perfect for both traditional "syrup" food such as pancakes and crepes, but also makes a great sauce for pork and lamb.
Servings Prep Time
2 cups 10 minutes
Cook Time
20 minutes
Servings Prep Time
2 cups 10 minutes
Cook Time
20 minutes
Homemade Blueberry and Mango Syrup
Mango and Blueberry Syrup
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Blueberry's also abound throughout the spring and summer (depends on variety) and are found anywhere that has acidic soil - particular in areas that have pine forests (the needles are acidic). These berries make excellent syrups and jams. The addition of mango gives this recipe and extra little bite and makes it perfect for both traditional "syrup" food such as pancakes and crepes, but also makes a great sauce for pork and lamb.
Servings Prep Time
2 cups 10 minutes
Cook Time
20 minutes
Servings Prep Time
2 cups 10 minutes
Cook Time
20 minutes
Ingredients
  • 1/2 cup granulated Sugar
  • 1 cup fresh Blueberries
  • 1 Mango peeled, seeded, and pureed
  • cup ¾Water
Servings: cups
Units:
Instructions
  1. Remove skin and seed from mango. Cut into small chunks and puree in a food processor or blender.
  2. In a small, heavy saucepan combine sugar, blueberries, mango puree, and water. Set heat to medium and bring mixture to a boil. Reduce temperature to low and simmer for 15 minutes. Skim foam during the cooking process.
  3. Remove from heat and let cool. Transfer to airtight container and store in refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.
Recipe Notes

Like mangoes? Find more mango ideas now.
 Homemade Blueberry and Mango Syrup

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About Lynne Jaques

Lynne is a stay-at-home mother of two boys. As a former US military officer and the spouse of an active duty US military member, Lynne enjoys traveling the world (although not the moving part!) and finding new cuisine and methods of preparing food. She also has the habit of using parenthesis way too much!

28 thoughts on “Fresh Berry Syrups: A Quick and Easy Way to Use Your Surplus”

  1. I love fruit syrups and I love to add them to my pancakes or waffles int he morning. I’ll usually add some whipped cream and/or fresh fruit and then I am set. The Mango Blueberry sounds like it would be really good. I’m going to print these out and try to take one or two of them sometime. I usually only get to eat a homemade breakfast on the weekend and these would make each breakfast so much better.

    I’m curious what the strawberry syrup would taste like over chicken. Do you have a specific chicken dish that you use it with? Just grilled chicken? I wouldn’t think that would go together. It’s an interesting combination.

  2. I will definitely try pairing the strawberry syrup with a creamy cheesecake! I believe these syrups are much better than store bought jams as less sugar is used and no artificial preservatives are used. The high sugar content on its own helps to protect the syrup from going bad too fast.

    Quick question: Can this method be similarly used with oranges to prepare marmalade?

  3. i love BERRY SYRUPS especially on pancakes, my friends and i always does this on weekends and I’m interested in making the Mango and Blueberry Syrup because this is a new type of syrup that I’ve seen that we haven’t tried yet. And do you think this would be good drizzled over vanilla ice cream?

  4. These syrups are going to be perfect for our Sunday pancake breakfast. It’s been a family tradition of ours for several years to have pancakes on Sunday, and these syrups are definitely going to add something special to our family breakfast. How long does the syrup keep? Thank you for yet another great recipe idea.

  5. I still have a lot of strawberries, blueberries and blackberries in my freezer, and these syrups are a lovely way of using some up and creating some delicious ideas. I will definitely be trying some of these in the next week or two.

    I wonder if these syrups would be good rippled through some homemade ice cream? Or, just dressed up in pretty jars, these would make lovely Christmas gifts too.

  6. I’m so sure that strawberry syrup up there will make my pancakes taste so heavenly…am trying to figure this out; strawberry/honey drizzle on my pancakes…oh…some!!…and hence the recipe has been taken for my own benefit 🙂

  7. Ooh, my mouth is watering now! They look delicous. I’ve not come across the term fruit syrup before; it must be an American thing (I’m UK-based). I’m guessing it’s a bit less solid then a jam (jelly?), more for spooning and drizzling than for spreading. Either way, they look delicious and I think the kids and I may be going blackberry picking this weekend! If we get a good haul I may try and scale up the recipe and put it by to brighten up the winter.

    • Fruit syrup is really similar to a regular maple syrup consistently. Just think of the liquid syrup. They work well on many different things. I actually prefer them to jelly/jam. I’m not sure if it is an American thing (I’m in the US), but fruit syrups are quite common when dining out for breakfast. One of the places that I frequent has a set of three fruit syrups on each table, along with packets of jam, for customers to choose from.

  8. How simple and delicious! I have a mulberry tree – I know some people aren’t fond of them, but I am! Do you think I could use these recipes with mulberries? Should I add extra sweetener since they’re rather bland?

    • Green-eyed with envy right about this minute, you are so lucky, a mulberry tree, i ‘d spend my late afternoons making syrups off those mulberrys and making pancakes throughout…js85, you are lucky :)…what i ‘d trade to be in your place, no clue but i wish. 🙂

  9. I like blackberries as they are high in Vitamin C and I like the taste, so I’m glad to find another way to serve them bedsides in a juice.

    The syrup looks straightforward for a novice like me to follow and it maybe the start of a new hobby for me. I think it would great in some cupcakes as a filling with some cream or a filling for a roulade.

  10. “Some berry stems are toxic, like elderberries, so if uncertain take a minute to conduct research or ask berry farmers.” — Wow, I had no idea. Thank God I didn’t try doing this. I’m always experimenting…. and who knows…

    Anyway, great recipes. I want to try the mango blueberry syrup. I’ve never thought of that combination. And it’d be perfect for mango season in Florida.

  11. For the blackberry syrup, I highly recommend just using a seedless blackberry jam instead of the real fruit. Blackberries are delicious, but they have horrendously annoying seeds, depending on the batch and the time they were harvested.

  12. Interesting Idea to use up all those over ripe berries! I have found freezing berries works good as well and then you can add to desserts, smoothies or even make fruit pops!

  13. Fresh fruit syrup is delicious. With all the great receipes you have here I am going to be very fat just trying them all out to see which ones I like the best.

  14. These syrups look so good. I have a bunch of cherries in the fridge that’s just sitting there. Will substitute some of these with cherries and see how it turns out.

  15. I love your pictures! They look absolutely delicious! I would love to make the fruit syrup and drizzle it over my pancakes in the morning. It sounds much healthier than the store-bought maple syrup and butter that my family usually likes to put on their breakfast. They might be good to put on the muffins that I baked yesterday also. They’re zucchini sausage muffins. Having the salty-ness of the sausage mix with the sweetness of the home-made berry syrup sounds divine.

  16. Here’s a secret: I cannot stand maple syrup. I just never developed the Canadian taste for it. However, I am all about fruit syrups. In fact, it’s really my only other option with pancakes over honey or agave nectar. I had a question about the consistency: Is there a suggested way to store the syrup so it keeps from thickening or separating?

  17. I mostly make my own syrups when the fruits that I bought are about to become overripe. That way you can maximize the sweetness because that’s when the fruit’s sugar levels are highest. Doing it that way also prevents wasteful discarding of your overripe fruits. In summer a I also make popsicles out of them. Just mix them up with a little milk and some sugar and freeze them up in moulds.

  18. I can’t decide which one I want to try first: mango blue eddy or strawberry. They both sound so great! Maybe in some oatmeal for breakfast on school days. I had no idea that it was going to be THIS quick and easy. Thank you!

  19. The overripe-ness of the fruit actually makes it more sweet. There is more fructose in a fruit as it gets more ripe. Syrups are really fun to make, not to mention very delicious to eat.

  20. I can’t believe I’ve never made fresh berry syrups, but I think now would be a good time to start. I have some strawberries I can use. I like that you’ve used turbinado or raw sugar, since I use them. I’m also glad you added a substitute for the arrowroot powder, because I don’t even know what that is, but I do always have cornstarch on hand. I’ve been craving crepes, so I think I’ll make some later, and make your fresh strawberry syrup to go with them!

  21. Oh, my! I love berry syrups. I mean, my favorite ever would be raspberry — there is something about the tartness of it that just goes great to sweet desserts like crepes and ice cream. But to be honest, this article made me severely crave fresh strawberries syrup. My stomach literally started growling when I saw the picture — and the recipe is so easy! Thanks!

    • True, gotta love them berry syrups <3 I love them on pancakes and french toast :3

      This article got so much great pics that I'm getting hungry, too 😛 I gotta keep my sugar intake in check though 😛 I've been eating too much sweets lately 😛 (dang it foodal, y u gotta have so much delicious sweet pics? XD)

  22. I when a blue berry tree upstate and always have a surplus at the end of the summer. I usually just freeze them to use during the winter months in smoothies or pancakes. I never thought about making syrup. I am looking for new ways to preserve them all the time and this seems like a great way.

  23. I have wanted to use up my old fruit before it gets too bad many times. Never thought to make a syrup…natural syrup. I especially have been trying to figure out what else to do with old bananas besides the usual banana pudding and pancakes. I would love to make a syrup…I love flavored syrup at IHOP. Wonderful recipe…I can’t wait to try this…and from now on this will give me a reason to purchase extra berries.

  24. I love berry picking at those you-pick-it farms. You can spend hours in those places just finding the biggest and best berries possible. I will have to do this again sometime soon, maybe this summer, and make some of these delicious syrups. Nothing spells awesome on ice cream or cake like a natural fruity topping. Now I’m drooling for berry picking season to get here so I can re-stock my shelves and get working on some delicious toppings.

  25. It definitely looks like an easy recipe, I will copy this down and try this mermelada really soon. I will try to make a strawberry syrop and see what I can get out of it, of course. Thank you for sharing this! Really appreciated.

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