Pot Roast Mushroom Soup: A Hearty Way to Use Your Leftovers!

It’s an inevitable outcome that you will have leftovers when you make a big pot roast dinner.

Vertical image of a large bowl filled with a brown, meaty stew, with text on the top and bottom of the image.

But what should you do with them, if you don’t want to eat the same thing for a few days in a row?

Not sure? Drawing a blank?

Maybe that’s because the bird bests the beef when it comes to leftovers!

There’s no surprise that turkey is the main meat that gets alllllllll of the attention with leftover recipes, especially when Thanksgiving comes around. A quick search on the internet pulls up countless recipes for sandwiches, stir-fries, pastas, casseroles, and soups.

Vertical top-down image of two white bowls filled with a meat stew surrounded by herbs and mushrooms.

The options are all delicious, of course, including our own recipe for white bean turkey chili.

But I’m tired of the turkey talk!

Holiday poultry aside, what are you supposed to do with the meaty leftovers from the dinners you make during the rest of the year?

Rather than simply reheating a plate of the same thing you had last night, dive a little deeper into the well of culinary creativity by making something new, exciting, and tasty.

Vertical close-up image of a bowl of dark brown stew on a white napkin.

Leftover pot roast is a perfect place to start!

If you live in a household that loves a hearty pot roast for a weeknight dinner, I have the perfect recipe to breathe new life into anything you may need to use up.

This ultra-savory pot roast mushroom soup will have you salivating during every single step of the cooking process.

Browning sliced mushrooms in an aromatic trio of onions, garlic, and thyme is just the beginning.

Vertical image of a bowl of meat and vegetable stew in a dark broth on a stand next to mushrooms.

The fun continues when the pan is deglazed with balsamic vinegar and beef stock, and thickened with a cornstarch slurry before adding big chunks of the pot roast.

You’ll be sneaking as many sips and spoonfuls as you possibly can as it cooks.

Vertical top-down image of a spoonful of a mushroom soup over two bowls.

The soup’s aroma is intoxicating as it gently bubbles on your stovetop, enticing you to use every single teaspoon you own as you repeat to yourself, “I’ll stop after this spoonful, I swear!”

Sure, pot roast leftovers are typical. But I’ll be surprised if you have any more leftovers after you make this irresistible recipe!

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Horizontal image of a white bowl filled with a dark brown chunky stew with a spoon.

Pot Roast Mushroom Soup


  • Author: Nikki Cervone
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 30 minutes
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: 4 servings 1x

Description

Not sure what to do with your leftover pot roast? Use the remaining meat to make our hearty and comforting soup with mushrooms in a rich broth.


Ingredients

Scale
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 small onion, diced (about 1 cup)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme, plus more for garnish
  • 8 ounces button mushrooms, stems removed and sliced
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 4 cups beef stock or beef broth, divided
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 2 cups chopped or shredded cooked pot roast
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt, plus more to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper, plus more to taste

Instructions

  1. Heat the olive oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion and saute for about 5 minutes, or until soft and translucent.
  2. Add the garlic and thyme and saute for an additional 30 seconds, stirring constantly.
  3. Add the mushrooms and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until they are dark brown and have released their moisture, about 5 to 8 minutes.
  4. Stir in the balsamic vinegar and 3 1/2 cups beef stock. Bring to a boil on a high heat, then reduce the heat to medium and simmer for 5 minutes.
  5. In a separate small bowl, whisk together the remaining 1/2 cup beef stock and cornstarch until there are no lumps. Slowly pour the cornstarch slurry into the soup, whisking constantly until completely incorporated. Simmer for another 5 minutes.
  6. Add the beef to the pot. Continue to cook for 10 to 20 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the soup has reduced and thickened slightly, or to your liking.
  7. Season the soup with salt and pepper to taste. Transfer to serving bowls and garnish with chopped thyme.
  • Category: Beef
  • Method: Stovetop
  • Cuisine: Soup

Keywords: beef, pot roast, mushroom, soup

Cooking by the Numbers…

Step 1 – Prep

Measure out the olive oil, balsamic vinegar, beef stock, and cornstarch. Set out the salt and pepper. Freshly cracked is best!

Horizontal image of assorted prepped ingredients in various white bowls.

Dice the onion, mince the garlic (or use a garlic press), chop the thyme, remove the stems and slice the mushrooms, and shred the meat with your hands or two forks.

I prefer larger chunks of meat to make a super hearty soup, but you can choose to shred it as finely as you would like.

Step 2 – Sweat the Aromatics

Heat the olive oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion and saute for about 5 minutes, or until soft and translucent.

Horizontal image of cooking diced onions in oil in a pot.

Add the garlic and thyme to the pot and saute for an additional 30 seconds, stirring constantly.

Don’t let the garlic brown, as it will continue to cook with the mushrooms in the next step.

Step 3 – Cook the Mushrooms

Horizontal image of cooking sliced mushrooms in a pot.

Add the mushrooms and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until they are dark brown and have released their moisture, about 5 to 8 minutes.

Step 4 – Deglaze the Pan

Add the balsamic vinegar and 3 1/2 cups beef stock, scraping up any brown bits from the bottom of the pot.

Horizontal image of a broth with sliced vegetables in a pot.

Bring to a boil on high heat, then reduce the heat to medium and simmer for 5 minutes.

Is the balsamic vinegar too tangy for you? You can choose to omit it from the recipe. You will not need to substitute the two tablespoons with any more stock.

Step 5 – Thicken

In a separate small bowl, whisk together the remaining 1/2 cup beef stock and cornstarch until there are no lumps.

Horizontal image of a light brown slurry in a white bowl.

Slowly pour the cornstarch slurry into the soup, whisking constantly until completely incorporated. Simmer for another 5 minutes.

Step 6 – Add the Meat and Reduce

Add the beef to the pot. Continue to cook for 10 to 20 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the soup has reduced and thickened slightly, or to your liking.

Horizontal image of a dark brown soup with meat and slices of vegetables in a pot.

Season with salt and pepper to taste. Transfer to serving bowls and garnish with chopped thyme.

Exactly How Much Should I Reduce the Liquid?

You can choose how much you want to reduce the broth in the final step of cooking. It all depends on what final consistency you prefer.

For a liquidy soup that you can have fun slurping, I recommend cooking the soup less, for no more than 15 minutes.

For a thicker and more condensed consistency that has all the comfort food vibes of a hearty stew, cook the soup for closer to 20 minutes in the final phase of cooking.

You can cook it for even longer if you love that rich texture! Just keep in mind that your yield will be smaller the more you reduce the soup.

Horizontal image of a white bowl filled with a dark brown chunky stew with a spoon.

Whether thin or thick, this soup is amazing served with a hunk of crusty bread for the best dipping device.

Keeping this meal gluten free? You can use your favorite gluten-free bread, or you can serve this soup with a side of roasted potatoes or creamy polenta.

As long as you team up with equally comforting side dishes, you’ll have a meal that will give you so much delicious nourishment in the evening!

For other meaty soup and stew recipes to keep your belly full and happy, make these recipes from Foodal next:

Photos by Nikki Cervone, © Ask the Experts, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. See our TOS for more details. Originally published on November 11, 2012. Last updated on September 12, 2021.

Nutritional information derived from a database of known generic and branded foods and ingredients and was not compiled by a registered dietitian or submitted for lab testing. It should be viewed as an approximation.

About Nikki Cervone

Nikki Cervone is a hungry foodie living in Pittsburgh. Nikki holds an AAS in baking/pastry from Westmoreland County Community College, a BA in Communications from Duquesne University, and an MLA in Gastronomy from Boston University. When she is not tearing through her city's best cheesesteaks, Nikki enjoys a healthy dose of yoga and chocolate. Lots of chocolate.

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